WEEKEND CHEF | Yes, you can! Make your own Crispy Kani Maki

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Crispy Kani Maki. Photo by Raff Zulueta for InterAksyon.com.

Crispy Kani Maki. Photo by Raff Zulueta for InterAksyon.com.

I love Japanese food, especially sushis and makis. My favorite, like many Filipinos, is California Maki because I love the way the flavors of mango, kani (crabstick), cucumber and tobiko (fish roe) come together and enhance the vinegared rice.

So when I was assigned to the cold kitchen to make makis, among others, for the Legacy Buffet (culminating activity) of my culinary class at the Center for Asian Culinary Studies (CACS) in 2008, I had a great time. And every time I attend Japanese food promotions of hotels or eat out in a Japanese restaurant, I really order California Maki along with one or two other sushis.

Last week, I ‘discovered’ another way to enjoy all the ingredients that I love in a California Maki without exactly having California Maki. Yes, it was still in a maki form, and, yes, it was just as delicious as my favorite classic maki. I found this dish in a press lunch held at Crowne Plaza Manila Galleria’s Seven Corners Restaurant to officially open the Japanese food promotion that was taking place in the restaurant for the whole month of April.

Japanese Master Chef Seiji Kamura at work. Photo by Raff Zulueta for InterAksyon.com.

Japanese Master Chef Seiji Kamura at work. Photo by Raff Zulueta for InterAksyon.com.

The featured chef is Japanese Master Chef Seiji Kamura, who is backed by 25 years of comprehensive knowledge of world-class Japanese cuisine and has been in Manila for the past 22 years. He helped open several Japanese restaurants, including his own, Seiji, and has authored three cookbooks on Japanese cooking.

For the ongoing Japanese food promotion at Crowne Plaza’s Seven Corners, Chef Seiji has created culinary masterpieces, including the Crispy Kani Maki that he featured in a cooking demonstration during the press lunch.

While he took the liberty of showing the steps in assembling his Crispy Kani Maki during the demo, Chef Seiji encouraged us to refer to his The Maya Kitchen: Secrets of Japanese Cooking cookbook published by Anvil Publishing Inc. for the recipe for sushi rice. Here, I am putting it all together—the recipe for the sushi rice and for the Crispy Kani Maki itself—to make it more convenient for everyone who wants to try making it.

CRISPY KANI MAKI

To make the sushi rice
5 cups hot cooked Japanese rice
2/3 cup vinegar
dash of salt
40 grams kombu (seaweed)*
1/4 cup sugar

1. Put hot cooked rice in a wooden or glass bowl, and set aside.

2. Boil together the remaining ingredients (*kombu can be bought from Japanese grocery stores). After boiling, remove kombu.

3. Pour hot vinegar mixture into the rice. Mix in with slicing motion to separate the rice grains without damaging them.

4. Fan the rice with a hand fan or electric fan to remove excess moisture.

5. Keep rice covered with a damp cloth.

To assemble
nori (seaweed) sheets
prepared sushi rice
Iceberg lettuce, white hard part removed
cucumber, cut into sticks
kani (crabsticks)
mango, sliced into strips
fried tempura batter crumbs

1. Lay a sushi mat on a clean, even working surface. Put a sheet of nori on top of it.

Step 1: Sperad a thin layer of sushi rice on the nori sheet. Photo by Raff Zulueta for InterAksyon.com.

Step 1: Sperad a thin layer of sushi rice on the nori sheet. Photo by Raff Zulueta for InterAksyon.com.

2. Spread a thin layer of sushi rice on the nori sheet, leaving only about half an inch on top without rice. Gently press down so rice will adhere to the nori sheet. Dip hands in a bowl of water occasionally so the rice won’t stick to your hands.

3. Invert so that the nori sheet now faces you. Layer the bottom side with lettuce, cucumber, kani and mango slices.

Step 3: Invert then line with lettuce, cucumber, kana, and mango. Photo by Raff Zulueta for InterAksyon.com.

Step 3: Invert then line with lettuce, cucumber, kani, and mango. Photo by Raff Zulueta for InterAksyon.com.

4. Roll up the maki with the use of the sushi mat. Make sure it’s tight enough so nothing spills out. Remove from sushi mat.

Roll tightly with the use of a sushi mat. Photo by Raff Zulueta for InterAksyon.com.

Roll tightly with the use of a sushi mat. Photo by Raff Zulueta for InterAksyon.com.

5. Crush some fried tempura batter crumbs and gently roll the maki log on the crumbs so they stick to it.

6. Slice maki log into one-inch maki pieces. Arrange on a plate still in a log-like manner.

Kani Salad Topping
kani (crabsticks), divided into two portions
Japanese mayonnaise
tobiko (fish roe)

1. Slice each kani into two or three segments.

2. Fry one portion in hot oil until crisp. Remove and drain off excess oil on paper towel. Then lightly crunch up so they get a little more crushed.

3. Mix together fried kani and regular kani. Add Japanese mayonnaise and mix them up a little more.

4. Spoon on top of the maki.

5. Sprinkle generously with tobiko, and serve with Kikkoman sauce and wasabi paste.

Source Article from http://www.interaksyon.com/article/84578/weekend-chef–yes-you-can-make-your-own-crispy-kani-maki
WEEKEND CHEF | Yes, you can! Make your own Crispy Kani Maki
http://www.interaksyon.com/article/84578/weekend-chef–yes-you-can-make-your-own-crispy-kani-maki
http://news.search.yahoo.com/news/rss?p=Japanese%20Class
Japanese Class – Yahoo News Search Results
Japanese Class – Yahoo News Search Results



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