• There is speculation that the cloud could be the result of a weapons test
  • But the U.S. has not done A-bomb tests since the Test Ban Treaty in 1992
  • Plume originated from White Sands Missile Range in Socorro county

By
Daily Mail Reporter

16:57 GMT, 19 March 2014


|

18:46 GMT, 19 March 2014

A mystery ‘storm cloud’ caught on weather radar after erupting off a U.S. military missile testing ground in New Mexico has left weather experts baffled.

Conspiracy theorists have speculated that the plume-like cloud, which seems to appear out of nowhere, could have been kicked up by the explosion from an unreported weapons test.

Deepening the mystery, U.S. National Weather Service offices in Albuquerque and El Paso have confirmed the reading, but say they have no idea where it could have come from.

The mysterious plume as it appeared on the radar at Plymouth State Weather Centre as it headed toward Cannon Air Force Base. Weather experts are baffled about where it could have come from

The mysterious plume as it appeared on the radar at Plymouth State Weather Centre as it headed toward Cannon Air Force Base. Weather experts are baffled about where it could have come from

The plume was tracked north-east, over Cannon Air Force Base near Clovis, home of the 27th Special Operations Group, over Amarillo in north Texas and towards the Oklahoma border

The plume was tracked north-east, over Cannon Air Force Base near Clovis, home of the 27th Special Operations Group, over Amarillo in north Texas and towards the Oklahoma border

The plume first appeared at sunset on Monday evening over the part of the vast White Sands Missile Range in east Socorro county, close to the ‘Trinity Site’ where the first atomic bomb was detonated in 1945.

It was spotted in publicly accessible radar data by a blogger, who tracked its progress and has published his findings in two YouTube videos and a blog post.

He showed how the Weather Channel’s storm identification system had detected the plume as a strong storm cell which seemingly emerged out of nowhere on a clear night.

A second view of the plume, on the College of DuPage’s NeXt Generation Weather Lab service, showed how it appeared to burst out of a small point, like the aftermath of a massive explosion.

The plume was tracked north-east, over Cannon Air Force Base near Clovis, home of the 27th Special Operations Group, over Amarillo in north Texas and towards the Oklahoma border, where it appeared to dissipate.

A closer look at the whereabouts of the beginning of the apparent weather event showed that it emerged from the White Sands Missile Range, a site which extends to some 3,200 sq/miles across New Mexico that is used as a proving ground for the U.S. military’s ballistic missiles.

In its previous incarnation as the Alamogordo Bombing and Gunnery Range, the site played host to the ‘Trinity’ test of the world’s first atomic bomb on July 16, 1945.

In that test scientists from the Manhattan Project exploded a 20 kiloton plutonium bomb of the same kind as the Fat Man device that was a month later dropped on the Japanese city of Nagasaki, killing 40,000 people instantly.

There is as yet no evidence of a nuclear explosion. The U.S. has not officially tested any atomic weapons since signing the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty in 1992.

The Trinity Site, where the world's first atomic bomb was detonated in July 1945, which is close to the source of the unexplained plume on the White Sands Missile Range

The Trinity Site, where the world’s first atomic bomb was detonated in July 1945, which is close to the source of the unexplained plume on the White Sands Missile Range

The Trinity test explosion pictured 0.016 seconds after detonation. The 20 kiloton plutonium bomb was of the same kind as the Fat Man device that was a month later dropped on the Japanese city of Nagasaki

The Trinity test explosion pictured 0.016 seconds after detonation. The 20 kiloton plutonium bomb was of the same kind as the Fat Man device that was a month later dropped on the Japanese city of Nagasaki

Nevertheless the bizarre ‘weather’ event’s appearance over a military site has led to speculation that some kind of massive weapon has been exploded at white sands, propelling a huge amount of particulate debris into the atmosphere.

With the Carrizozo volcanic field just east of the site, another possible explanation could that a volcanic eruption – which has gone unreported for whatever reason – could be the source of the plume.

There have been been no eyewitness reports or photographs of the plume, and no official statements from agencies involved in either missile testing or geology.

Weather experts told KOB Eyewitness News 4 that they have no idea what it could be. So, whatever the source of the reading, the consensus appears to be that it was not weather related.

The comments below have not been moderated.

Justine,

Santa Fe, United States,

moments ago

I¿m familiar with the blogger “Dutchsinse”. Personally I view him as an alarmist. Biased reporting usually involves a one-sided presentation rife with emotionally charged language and images. ¿Good reporting¿ includes an attempt at balance by including alternate views. Can¿t say he¿s alone in this based on our own local coverage so far.

dutchsinse,

saint louis, United States,

15 minutes ago

My videos are on youtube, my name is Dutchsinse, Michael Janitch…… and I’m not a conspiracy theorist. Lol…

The plume is not a conspiracy, its a military test which blew too dar down wind. Enough said.

Like how you guys RIPPED my vids and put your own ads on them, and didnt link back to my channel or blog. You even ripped the .gifs I MADE.

LOLOLOLOL … cheers mates!

Completely Average,

Somewhere, United States,

7 minutes ago

You’re worst than a conspiracy theorist, you’re a laughable boob. ———- At least conspiracy theorists make a vague attempt to support their claims with something resembling science, you apparently just make stuff up for the fun of it. ——————— BTW, it was a common Haboob, kicked up by the strong cold front that moved through the area last weekend. Happens several times a year, every year, like clockwork. Here in Texas it’s commonly known as Spring.

dutchsinse,

saint louis, United States,

24 minutes ago

My videos are on youtube, my name is Dutchsinse, Michael Janitch…… and I’m not a conspiracy theorist. Lol…

The plume is not a conspiracy, its a military test which blew too dar down wind. Enough said.

Like how you guys RIPPED my vids and put your own ads on them, and didnt link back to my channel or blog. You even ripped the .gifs I MADE.

LOLOLOLOL … cheers mates!

Completely Average,

Somewhere, United States,

29 minutes ago

Funny how this plume was “unknown” by weather experts in New Mexico, but by the time the Haboob had made it to Texas the National Weather Service had already put out a warning for it. —————————— Funny how the DM ran a story about the Haboob and even included pictures of it on radar, but failed to make the connection.

Rainbow Joe,

Knebworth, United Kingdom,

36 minutes ago

I’m not saying the mysterious cloud is from aliens, but it’s from aliens

Know Body,

anytown, United States,

46 minutes ago

I’m sure this is somehow related to global warming – I mean climate change

soldierboy,

edinburgh,

54 minutes ago

The monument showing the test site of the First test is nothing to be proud off,and should be removed

Toughtask,

Birmingham, United Kingdom,

1 hour ago

Here we go self appointed armchair experts with their numbscull theories copied and pasted from the Internet and the swivel eyed loons that are conspiracy theorists will be posting like crazy. They never need much encouragement

2 of 3 repliesSee all replies

girlygirlLA,

Los Angeles, United States,

49 minutes ago

I have followed this blogger for years since he first tracked the radiation emissions following the Japan nuclear reactor explosions. He has compiled lots of data especially in the area of geographic engineering. His work is quite impressive.

girlygirlLA,

Los Angeles, United States,

48 minutes ago

I have followed this blogger for years, since he tracked radioactive emissions following the Japan nuclear reactor explosions. His work is quite impressive.

Toughtask,

Birmingham, United Kingdom,

1 hour ago

Here we go self appointed armchair experts with their numbscull theories copied and pasted from the Internet and the swivel eyed loons that are conspiracy theorists will be posting like crazy. They never need much encouragement

idahoguy101,

Caldwell, United States,

1 hour ago

I’ve heard of a meteorological term, microburst. Is there such a thing as a Macroburst?

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