Archive for the ‘Japanese Language’ Category

Toolkits for the Mind

木曜日, 4月 2nd, 2015

When the Japanese computer scientist Yukihiro Matsumoto decided to create Ruby, a programming language that has helped build Twitter, Hulu, and much of the modern Web, he was chasing an idea from a 1966 science fiction novel called Babel-17 by Samuel R. Delany. At the book’s heart is an invented language of the same name that upgrades the minds of all those who speak it. “Babel-17 is such an exact analytical language, it almost assures you technical mastery of any situation you look at,” the protagonist says at one point. With Ruby, Matsumoto wanted the same thing: to reprogram and improve the way programmers think.

It sounds grandiose, but Matsumoto’s isn’t a fringe view. Software developers as a species tend to be convinced that programming languages have a grip on the mind strong enough to change the way you approach problems—even to change which problems you think to solve. It’s how they size up companies, products, their peers: “What language do you use?”

That can help outsiders understand the software companies that have become so powerful and valuable, and the products and services that infuse our lives. A decision that seems like the most inside kind of inside baseball—whether someone builds a new thing using, say, Ruby or PHP or C—can suddenly affect us all. If you want to know why Facebook looks and works the way it does and what kinds of things it can do for and to us next, you need to know something about PHP, the programming language Mark Zuckerberg built it with.

Among programmers, PHP is perhaps the least respected of all programming languages. A now canonical blog post on its flaws described it as “a fractal of bad design,” and those who willingly use it are seen as amateurs. “There’s this myth of the brilliant engineering that went into Facebook,” says Jeff Atwood, co-creator of the popular programming question–and-answer site Stack Overflow. “But they were building PHP code in Windows XP. They were hackers in almost the derogatory sense of the word.” In the space of 10 minutes, Atwood called PHP “a shambling monster,” “a pandemic,” and a haunted house whose residents have come to love the ghosts.

Most successful programming languages have an overall philosophy or set of guiding principles that organize their vocabulary and grammar—the set of possible instructions they make available to the programmer—into a logical whole. PHP doesn’t. Its creator, Rasmus Lerdorf, freely admits he just cobbled it together. “I don’t know how to stop it,” he said in a 2003 interview. “I have absolutely no idea how to write a programming language—I just kept adding the next logical step along the way.”

Programmers’ favorite example is a PHP function called “mysql_escape_string,” which rids a query of malicious input before sending it off to a database. (For an example of a malicious input, think of a form on a website that asks for your e-mail address; a hacker can enter code in that slot to force the site to cough up passwords.) When a bug was discovered in the function, a new version was added, called “mysql_real_escape_string,” but the original was not replaced. The result is a bit like having two similar-looking buttons right next to each other in an airline cockpit: one that puts the landing gear down and one that puts it down safely. It’s not just an affront to common sense—it’s a recipe for disaster.

Yet despite the widespread contempt for PHP, much of the Web was built on its back. PHP powers 39 percent of all domains, by one estimate. Facebook, Wikipedia, and the leading publishing platform WordPress are all PHP projects. That’s because PHP, for all its flaws, is perfect for getting started. The name originally stood for “personal home page.” It made it easy to add dynamic content like the date or a user’s name to static HTML pages. PHP allowed the leap from tinkering with a website to writing a Web application to be so small as to be imperceptible. You didn’t need to be a pro.

PHP’s get-going-ness was crucial to the success of Wikipedia, says Ori Livneh, a principal software engineer at the Wikimedia Foundation, which operates the project. “I’ve always loathed PHP,” he tells me. The project suffers from large-scale design flaws as a result of its reliance on the language. (They are partly why the foundation didn’t make Wikipedia pages available in a version adapted for mobile devices until 2008, and why the site didn’t get a user-friendly editing interface until 2013.) But PHP allowed people who weren’t—or were barely—software engineers to contribute new features. It’s how Wikipedia entries came to display hieroglyphics on Egyptology pages, for instance, and handle sheet music.

The programming language PHP ­created and sustains Facebook’s move-fast, hacker-oriented corporate culture.

You wouldn’t have built Google in PHP, because Google, to become Google, needed to do exactly one thing very well—it needed search to be spare and fast and meticulously well engineered. It was made with more refined and powerful languages, such as Java and C++. Facebook, by contrast, is a bazaar of small experiments, a smorgasbord of buttons, feeds, and gizmos trying to capture your attention. PHP is made for making—for cooking up features quickly.

You can almost imagine Zuckerberg in his Harvard dorm room on the fateful day that Facebook was born, doing the least he could to get his site online. The Web moves so fast, and users are so fickle, that the only way you’ll ever be able to capture the moment is by being first. It didn’t matter if he made a big ball of mud, or a plate of spaghetti, or a horrible hose cabinet (to borrow from programmers’ rich lexicon for describing messy code). He got the thing done. People could use it. He wasn’t thinking about beautiful code; he was thinking about his friends logging in to “Thefacebook” to look at pictures of girls they knew.

Today Facebook is worth more than $200 billion and there are signs all over the walls at its offices: “Done is better than perfect”; “Move fast and break things.” These bold messages are supposed to keep employees in tune with the company’s “hacker” culture. But these are precisely PHP’s values. Moving fast and breaking things is in fact so much the essence of PHP that anyone who “speaks” the language indelibly thinks that way. You might say that the language itself created and sustains Facebook’s culture.

The secret weapon

If you wanted to find the exact opposite of PHP, a kind of natural experiment to show you what the other extreme looked like, you couldn’t do much better than the self-serious Lower Manhattan headquarters of the financial trading firm Jane Street Capital. The 400-person company claims to be responsible for roughly 2 percent of daily equity trading volume in the United States.

When I meet Yaron Minsky, Jane Street’s head of technology, he’s sitting at a desk with a working Enigma machine beside him, one of only a few dozen of the World War II code devices left in the world. I would think it the clear winner of the contest for Coolest Secret Weapon in the Room if it weren’t for the way he keeps talking about an obscure programming language called OCaml. Minsky, a computer science PhD, convinced his employer 10 years ago to rewrite the company’s entire trading system in OCaml. Before that, almost nobody used the language for actual work; it was developed at a French research institute by academics trying to improve a computer system that automatically proves mathematical theorems. But Minsky thought OCaml, which he had gotten to know in grad school, could replace the complex Excel spreadsheets that powered Jane Street’s trading systems.

OCaml’s big selling point is its “type system,” which is something like Microsoft Word’s grammar checker, except that instead of just putting a squiggly green line underneath code it thinks is wrong, it won’t let you run it. Programs written with a type system tend to be far more reliable than those written without one—useful when a program might trade $30 billion on a big day.

Minsky says that by catching bugs, OCaml’s type system allows Jane Street’s coders to focus on loftier problems. One wonders if they have internalized the system’s constant nagging over time, so that OCaml has become a kind of Newspeak that makes it impossible to think bad thoughts.

The catch is that for the type checker to do its job, the programmers have to add complex annotations to their code. It’s as if Word’s grammar checker required you to diagram all your sentences. Writing code with type constraints can be a nuisance, even demoralizing. To make it worse, OCaml, more than most other programming languages, traffics in a kind of deep abstract math far beyond most coders. The language’s rigor is like catnip to some people, though, giving Jane Street an unusual advantage in the tight hiring market for programmers. Software developers mostly join Facebook and Wikipedia in spite of PHP. Minsky says that OCaml—along with his book Real World OCaml—helps lure a steady supply of high-quality candidates. The attraction isn’t just the language but the kind of people who use it. Jane Street is a company where they play four-person chess in the break room. The culture of competitive intelligence and the use of a fancy programming language seem to go hand in hand.

Google appears to be trying to pull off a similar trick with Go, a high–performance programming language it developed. Intended to make the workings of the Web more elegant and efficient, it’s good for developing the kind of high-stakes software needed to run the collections of servers behind large Web services. It also acts as something like a dog whistle to coders interested in the new and the difficult.

Growing up

In late 2010, Facebook was having a crisis. PHP was not built for performance, but it was being asked to perform. The site was growing so fast it seemed that if something didn’t change fairly drastically, it would start falling over.

Switching languages altogether wasn’t an option. Facebook had millions of lines of PHP code, thousands of engineers expert in writing it, and more than half a billion users. Instead, a small team of senior engineers was assigned to a special project to invent a way for Facebook to keep functioning without giving up on its hacky mother tongue.

One part of the solution was to create a piece of software—a compiler—that would translate Facebook’s PHP code into much faster C++ code. The other was a feat of computer linguistic engineering that let Facebook’s programmers keep their PHP-ian culture but write more reliable code.

Startups can cleverly use the power of programming languages to manipulate their organizational psychology.

The rescue squad did it by inventing a dialect of PHP called Hack. Hack is PHP with an optional type system; that is, you can write plain old quick and dirty PHP—or, if you so choose, you can tie yourself to the mast, adding annotations to let the type system check the correctness of your code. That this type checker is written entirely in OCaml is no coincidence. Facebook wanted its coders to keep moving fast in the comfort of their native tongue, but it didn’t want them to have to break things as they did it. (Last year Zuckerberg announced a new engineering slogan: “Move fast with stable infra,” using the hacker shorthand for the infrastructure that keeps the site running.)

Around the same time, Twitter underwent a similar transformation. The service was originally built with Ruby on Rails—a popular Web programming framework created using Matsumoto’s Ruby and inspired in large part by PHP. Then came the deluge of users. When someone with hundreds of thousands of followers tweeted, hundreds of thousands of other people’s timelines had to be immediately updated. Big tweets like that would frequently overwhelm the system and force engineers to take the site down to allow it to catch up. They did it so often that the “fail whale” on the company’s maintenance page became famous in its own right. Twitter stopped the bleeding by replacing large pieces of the service’s plumbing with a language called Scala. It should not be surprising that Scala, like OCaml, was developed by academics, has a powerful type system, and prizes correctness and performance even at the expense of the individual programmers’ freedom and delight in their craft.

Much as startups “mature” by finally figuring out where their revenue will come from, they can cleverly use the power of programming languages to manipulate their organizational psychology. Programming–language designer Guido van Rossum, who spent seven years at Google and now works at Dropbox, says that once a software company gets to be a certain size, the only way to stave off chaos is to use a language that requires more from the programmer up front. “It feels like it’s slowing you down, because you have to say everything three times,” van Rossum says. That is why many startups wait as long as they can before making the switch. You lose some of the swaggering hackers who got you started, and the possibility that small teams can rush out new features. But a more exacting language helps people across the company understand one another’s code and gives your product the stability needed to be part of the furniture of daily life.

That software startups can perform such maneuvers might even help explain why they can be so powerful. The expanding reach of computers is part of it. But these companies also have a unique ability to remake themselves. As they change and grow, they can do more than just redraw the org chart. Because they are built in code, they can do something far more drastic. They can rewire themselves, their culture, the very way they think.

James Somers is a writer and ­programmer in New York. He works at Genius.com.

Source Article from http://www.technologyreview.com/review/536356/toolkits-for-the-mind/
Toolkits for the Mind
http://www.technologyreview.com/review/536356/toolkits-for-the-mind/
http://news.search.yahoo.com/news/rss?p=japanese%20language
japanese language – Yahoo News Search Results
japanese language – Yahoo News Search Results



Taiwanese writer Chou Chin-bo as war victim

火曜日, 3月 31st, 2015

Recently I was asked to translate into English a short story that the Taiwanese writer Chou Chin-bo wrote in Japanese back in 1941. I was happy with this request. I was born in Taipei in 1942, but ever since my family was forced out of the island upon Japan’s defeat in the war, in 1945, I have never really had anything to do with Taiwan.

If there was one exception in the past 70 years, it occurred a dozen years ago when Sallie Huang got in touch with me to ask for my help with the Japanese-language part of the trilingual pamphlet she was writing (the two others were English and Chinese).

At the time China’s insistence that Taiwan was part of its sovereignty was reaching another danger point, and Huang argued that China got its history all wrong. (“Grass-root case for independent Taiwan,” JT, Dec 27, 2004).

Chou’s story in question, “The Volunteer” (Shiganhei), so radically reflects the popular sentiments in Taiwan circa 1940 — at least one segment thereof — that a bit of historical background may be called for.

Taiwan became Japan’s colony in 1895. The island was one of the territories Japan demanded from China and got, following its war against it. About this, Huang pointed out an interesting story that China is unlikely to give in its modern history.

Li Hongzhang, China’s viceroy and minister who negotiated the settlement with Japan, was privately happy to get rid of Taiwan as an epidemic-ridden island where some indigenous tribes still practiced headhunting. In fact, the Japanese military lost far greater numbers of people during “the pacification of Taiwan” from disease than during the direct fights with China.

That didn’t change the fact that Japan’s possession of Taiwan was its imperialist act. But imperialism prevailed at the time. Japan itself was forced to end its semi-isolationist policy lasting more than 200 years because of the imperialist powers vying in East Asia.

Even as the British and Dutch empires continued to expand their stakes in South Asia, France took over much of modern-day Vietnam to set up French Indochina, in 1887, then added Laos to its Asian colonies in 1893.

The United States wasn’t far behind. In 1898 it wrested the Philippines from Spain, then followed it with the infamously brutal suppression of insurgents.

Like any colonizer nation, Japan met resistance and revolts, and the Taiwanese efforts for greater autonomy and independence continued until Japan suppressed them in the late 1930s.

A colony necessarily draws immigrants from the sovereignty nation seeking jobs and other opportunities. My father was typical. In the chronic recession of the 1920s he couldn’t find a job that suited him.

So he asked his father if he could move to Taiwan. His father, a cop in a small village, told him, “Sure, but I can give you only a one-way ticket.”

My father found Taiwan also in economic difficulties and couldn’t land a job until he gained a spot in the police after a fiercely competitive exam. In time he was sent to the Police College in Tokyo, graduated near the top, and joined the Special Higher Police.

Colonials also move to the colonizer country. Our writer Chou Chin-bo may be a good example. He was born in 1920, in Keelung, the important northern port town of Taiwan, but his parents apparently moved to Tokyo in his infancy. Chou was educated there, and graduated from the dental college of the Nihon University.

One estimate of the number of Taiwanese who went to Japan for higher education put the cumulative total of 200,000 in 1945. In contrast, Japanese civilians who had to leave Taiwan after Japan’s defeat is put at 320,000.

In the latter half of the 1930s, Japan pushed a Japanization policy in Taiwan. Called kouminka, “turning colony people into the Emperor’s people,” it included promotion of the use of the Japanese language in schools as well as in homes, and the adoption of Japanese customs and Shintoism.

My mother was a schoolteacher and thus may well have been part of the kouminka efforts, though I never asked her exactly when her own family moved to Taiwan.

Changing surnames to Japanese-sounding names wasn’t promoted, unlike in Korea. But some Taiwanese changed their names, believing that doing so would help their social advancement.

In June 1941 the Japanese military announced it was accepting volunteers in Taiwan starting the next year.

Chou’s short story “The Volunteer” — written in Japanese, to remind — reflects all these developments in acute fashion, and more: the persisting sense among the Taiwanese that they were culturally, socially, behind Japan. This unbalanced relationship, I assume, is what happens between sovereignty and colony.

Its narrator is someone who had received higher education in Tokyo eight years earlier, and now back in Keelung. When the story begins, he is now out in the port to welcome his younger brother-in-law returning from Tokyo after studying there for three years. Both are, you may assume, the author’s alter egos.

The third character is the brother-in-law’s friend, who hasn’t gone beyond junior high school and hasn’t visited Japan. Still, the narrator compliments him on his Japanese, here called kokugo, “the national language,” as Japanese is called in Japan even to this day.

These three young men mainly discuss the pressing concerns as they relate to Japan: Taiwanese becoming “the Emperor’s people”; Taiwanese Japanizing their surnames; and the volunteer system that Japanese military are considering. In fact, the brother-in-law’s friend has already changed his surname from Taka — the Japanese pronunciation of the Chinese gao — to Takamine. In addition, he claps his hands in praying at a Shinto shrine the Japanese way.

And it is this young man, Takamine, who startles his friends by submitting to the army a volunteer application with a blood oath, neither demanded nor warranted.

This theme of “The Volunteer” evident in these descriptions was found to be too pro-Japanese after Japan’s defeat, and Chou became a literary “taboo,” condemned as a “kouminka writer,” under Chiang Kai-shek’s Kuomintang. Thus Chou became one of the victims for having been on the losing side, albeit in a colony. Shall we judge Japan’s colonization of Taiwan wrong?

Perhaps not. One clue for this may be the opinion surveys taken in Taiwan in recent decades. In many, the island’s people have ranked Japan as the most friendly and closest among the nations. Some explicitly say the Japanese colonization was beneficial to Taiwan.

But there is a caveat about such retrospective judgments. These may depend to a large extent on what happens after the colonizer nation leaves — in this instance, the Kuomintang regime that did not enjoy too good a reputation.

A frequent contributor to The Japan Times, Hiroaki Sato is a poet, translator and essayist who lives in New York City.

Source Article from http://www.japantimes.co.jp/opinion/2015/03/30/commentary/world-commentary/taiwanese-writer-chou-chin-bo-war-victim/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=taiwanese-writer-chou-chin-bo-war-victim
Taiwanese writer Chou Chin-bo as war victim
http://www.japantimes.co.jp/opinion/2015/03/30/commentary/world-commentary/taiwanese-writer-chou-chin-bo-war-victim/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=taiwanese-writer-chou-chin-bo-war-victim
http://news.search.yahoo.com/news/rss?p=japanese%20language
japanese language – Yahoo News Search Results
japanese language – Yahoo News Search Results



10-day U.S. tour brings Japanese students to Shaler

火曜日, 3月 31st, 2015





Students from two Japanese high schools visited Shaler Area High School for three days as part of a 10-day tour of the United States and shared their culture and traditions with students and community members.

Their visit was part of the Kakehashi Project, an initiative of the Japanese government to promote youth exchanges and foster relationships and understanding between the United States and Japan. Kakehashi means “bridge building� in Japanese.

“We’re trying to reintroduce Japan to the American public,â€� said Helen von Gohren, guide for the Japanese students and a representative of the Laurasian Institute.

The Laurasian Institute, based in Seattle, arranged the trip.

The visiting students, who ranged in age from 16 to 18, gave presentations on traditional Japanese culture and everyday life as a high school student at a community event March 23 in the high school auditorium. The 24 students were from Igusa High School and Suginami Sogo High School in Tokyo.

More than 100 people attended the event, which also featured a performance by Pittsburgh Taiko, a traditional Japanese drum-performance troupe.

A Japanese student commutes to and from school via public transportation or bike. They stay with their homeroom class for most of the school day, eat lunch in their classroom during a mid-day break, and participate in clubs and sports after school.

Steve Balsamico, Shaler Area High School Japanese-language teacher, said his students were finding a lot more similarities than they expected between American and Japanese teen culture. For instance, the Japanese students spend their free time studying, reading books, going shopping, talking with friends and playing games on their phones.

The visit was well-received by the Shaler high school students, Balsamico said, and might have sparked more interest in the Japanese-language program at the high school.

“There’s been a positive response to it,â€� he said.

The visiting Japanese students spoke English at varying skill levels, so communication wasn’t a problem. Balsamico said it’s mandatory for Japanese students to learn English, although the focus is more on the written word than spoken.

Von Gohren said the visiting students loved their visit to Shaler Area. One student introduced the Shaler Area students to futsal, a variation on soccer, in gym class, while another got to work with wood in shop class.

“They love it,â€� she said. “They think it’s very intense, but they’re having so much fun.â€�

Hikaru Shirai, 18, a student at Suginami Sogo High School, said he was enjoying the trip and that America was much bigger than he expected.

“So fun,� he said. “Pittsburgh is a very nice city.�

The Japanese students stayed with Shaler Area families and left early March 26 to finish their American tour in San Francisco.

Rachel Farkas is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 724-772-6364 or rfarkas@tribweb.com.





































Source Article from http://triblive.com/neighborhoods/yournorthhills/yournorthhillsmore/8048547-74/japanese-students-shaler
10-day U.S. tour brings Japanese students to Shaler
http://triblive.com/neighborhoods/yournorthhills/yournorthhillsmore/8048547-74/japanese-students-shaler
http://news.search.yahoo.com/news/rss?p=japanese%20language
japanese language – Yahoo News Search Results
japanese language – Yahoo News Search Results



In Norwin district, Japanese students get a glimpse of life in the U.S.

金曜日, 3月 27th, 2015

As Norwin host families waited Monday night for visiting students to arrive from Japan, they talked about their plans to share American culture and landmarks with the visitors.


“Our [exchange student] said she likes gardens, so I’m taking her to Phipps,” sophomore Hayley Lovett said, referring to Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens in Oakland.


“We’re going to have a bonfire with s’mores,” Ludwig Kubli said. He and his wife, Marian, planned to take their son, Zak, and their exchange student to Red Robin for a distinctly American hamburger.




The 23 Japanese students were driven from Pittsburgh International Airport and walked into the Norwin High School cafeteria shortly after 9 p.m. They had flown from Seattle to Pittsburgh with a long layover in Chicago and would spend two days in the Norwin School District.


The students are from the Japanese Island of Kyushu and were visiting as part of an exchange program sponsored by the Japan Foundation’s Kakehashi project. Kakehashi means “a bridge connecting two sides with differences,” according to a district news release.


Scott Polen, teacher of advanced placement world history and a former Japanese language teacher at Norwin, said the program would give the Japanese students a chance to experience a day in the life of students in the United States.


On Tuesday, the Japanese students shadowed Norwin High School students for the day, with Norwin Japanese language students accompanying the visitors to help with communication, Mr. Polen said.


On Wednesday, the visitors were to give presentations about their culture to students at Norwin Middle School and the high school.


Tom Iwinski said his oldest son, Jake, a sophomore at Norwin, had used Skype to talk with their exchange student, Koki Fukuda, 17, to learn his interests before he arrived.


Koki said he was surprised that the guardrails were low enough that he could see Seattle as he was riding a bus. In Japan, the walls along roads are so high you can’t see the landscape, he said.


“I want to [experience] America,” he said.


Take Ichinose, 17, said he was surprised by the many lanes of traffic in Seattle. The one thing he wanted to do here, he said, was to taste American sushi because he has heard that American and Japanese sushi are different.


Misono Kadowaki and Yuki Ishikawa stayed with Rosanne and Kurt Novotnak’s family.


Mrs. Novotnak said the girls showed her photos of their homes and families, including their grandparents and pets, in Japan. They were willing to try any American food, she said, and ate the bacon, sausage, eggs, toast, strawberries and mango juice she served.


“They were very excited to ride the school bus,” she added.


Among the places that the host families planned to take the visitors were the inclines on Mount Washington and St. Stephen Byzantine Catholic Church in North Huntingdon.


Mrs. Novotnak said Mr. Polen also suggested the families take the Japanese students to American grocery stores.


Anne Cloonan, freelance writer: suburbanliving@post-gazette.com.

Source Article from http://www.post-gazette.com/news/education/2015/03/27/Norwin-school-district-Japanese-students-get-a-glimpse-of-life-in-the-U-S/stories/201503270097
In Norwin district, Japanese students get a glimpse of life in the U.S.
http://www.post-gazette.com/news/education/2015/03/27/Norwin-school-district-Japanese-students-get-a-glimpse-of-life-in-the-U-S/stories/201503270097
http://news.search.yahoo.com/news/rss?p=japanese%20language
japanese language – Yahoo News Search Results
japanese language – Yahoo News Search Results



Miss Universe Japan crowns first biracial winner

金曜日, 3月 27th, 2015

TOKYO, JAPAN – She was born and raised in Japan, is a Japanese citizen, speaks the language fluently and is a master of Japanese calligraphy, but the newly crowned Miss Universe Japan is being criticized for not being “Japanese enough.”

Why? The country is largely homogenous, with 98 percent Japanese nationals. But Ariana Miyamoto’s father is African American, making her the first biracial Miss Japan.

The 20-year-old model insists, she might not look Japanese on the outside, but she is on the inside. Now, she’s focused on preparing for the Miss Universe pageant in January.

Source Article from http://cw39.com/2015/03/26/miss-universe-japan-crowns-first-biracial-winner/
Miss Universe Japan crowns first biracial winner
http://cw39.com/2015/03/26/miss-universe-japan-crowns-first-biracial-winner/
http://news.search.yahoo.com/news/rss?p=japanese%20language
japanese language – Yahoo News Search Results
japanese language – Yahoo News Search Results

Miss Universe Japan criticised as 'not Japanese enough'

木曜日, 3月 26th, 2015

SHE was born and raised in Nagasaki, speaks Japanese as her first language and has a Japanese mother – but Miss Universe contestant Ariana Miyamoto is facing criticism from those who say she is not “Japanese enough”.

The 20-year-old model became the first ever mixed-race beauty pageant winner when she was crown Miss Nagazaki earlier this year, success which has not come without challenges in one of the least racially diverse countries in the world.

Ms Miyamoto grew up in the city of Sasebo near a major US naval base, and her father is an African-American man from Arkansas. She also travelled to the US to go to high school – and some in Japan think all that makes her unfit to represent the nation of her birth.

At 6ft tall in heels, Ms Miyamoto told CNN’s Will Ripley she had always stood out in Japan and that when she was young she was bullied for being different. “In school people used to throw rubbish at me,” she said. “They also used racial slurs.”

In Japan, mixed-race people are known as “hafu”, and after Ms Miyamoto was selected as Miss Universe Japan last week social media users have been asking if it is “ok to choose a hafu to represent Japan?”

According to a translation by the Washington Post, one posted a picture with the caption: “The contradiction that is having a haafu Miss Universe Japan.”

Ms Miyamoto has a Japanese mother and an African-American father.
Ms Miyamoto has a Japanese mother and an African-American father.

Another said: “Even though she’s Miss Universe Japan, her face is foreign no matter how you look at it!”

And a third user tweeted: “Beauty contest. Miss Universe Japan is….wha? What kind of person? She’s ….not…..Japanese…right?”

The view on the ground in Tokyo was similar. Shown a picture of Ms Miyamoto and asked if she could be the country’s Miss Universe contestant, a middle-aged resident named Ishiko Komagawa said: “No, she doesn’t even look Japanese.”

But that view spans generations – high school student Tomoki Nogami said Ms Miyamoto should not be accepted because “half is not 100 per cent Japanese”. “If someone is chosen as Miss Japan both her parents should be Japanese,” he said.

The website Kotaku hailed Ms Miyamoto’s selection as a sign that change was occurring in Japan – if “slowly”. It noted that “many of the highest-rated comments” about Miyamoto on the Japanese site GirlsChannel “said that they wanted a more ‘Japanese’ contestant to represent Japan”.

“However, not everyone thinks that way,” it said. “There were comments supporting her selection, with people saying that the only thing that matters is whether or not she’s a citizen and loves this country or whether or not she was born and raised in Japan.

“Others said criticizing the selection because she wasn’t ‘Japanese’ enough was ‘pathetic’ and outdated thinking.”

Source Article from http://www.qt.com.au/news/miss-universe-japan-criticised-not-japanese-enough/2587553/
Miss Universe Japan criticised as 'not Japanese enough'
http://www.qt.com.au/news/miss-universe-japan-criticised-not-japanese-enough/2587553/
http://news.search.yahoo.com/news/rss?p=japanese%20language
japanese language – Yahoo News Search Results
japanese language – Yahoo News Search Results

Miss Universe Japan criticised as 'not Japanese enough'

木曜日, 3月 26th, 2015

SHE was born and raised in Nagasaki, speaks Japanese as her first language and has a Japanese mother – but Miss Universe contestant Ariana Miyamoto is facing criticism from those who say she is not “Japanese enough”.

The 20-year-old model became the first ever mixed-race beauty pageant winner when she was crown Miss Nagazaki earlier this year, success which has not come without challenges in one of the least racially diverse countries in the world.

Ms Miyamoto grew up in the city of Sasebo near a major US naval base, and her father is an African-American man from Arkansas. She also travelled to the US to go to high school – and some in Japan think all that makes her unfit to represent the nation of her birth.

At 6ft tall in heels, Ms Miyamoto told CNN’s Will Ripley she had always stood out in Japan and that when she was young she was bullied for being different. “In school people used to throw rubbish at me,” she said. “They also used racial slurs.”

In Japan, mixed-race people are known as “hafu”, and after Ms Miyamoto was selected as Miss Universe Japan last week social media users have been asking if it is “ok to choose a hafu to represent Japan?”

According to a translation by the Washington Post, one posted a picture with the caption: “The contradiction that is having a haafu Miss Universe Japan.”

Ms Miyamoto has a Japanese mother and an African-American father.
Ms Miyamoto has a Japanese mother and an African-American father.

Another said: “Even though she’s Miss Universe Japan, her face is foreign no matter how you look at it!”

And a third user tweeted: “Beauty contest. Miss Universe Japan is….wha? What kind of person? She’s ….not…..Japanese…right?”

The view on the ground in Tokyo was similar. Shown a picture of Ms Miyamoto and asked if she could be the country’s Miss Universe contestant, a middle-aged resident named Ishiko Komagawa said: “No, she doesn’t even look Japanese.”

But that view spans generations – high school student Tomoki Nogami said Ms Miyamoto should not be accepted because “half is not 100 per cent Japanese”. “If someone is chosen as Miss Japan both her parents should be Japanese,” he said.

The website Kotaku hailed Ms Miyamoto’s selection as a sign that change was occurring in Japan – if “slowly”. It noted that “many of the highest-rated comments” about Miyamoto on the Japanese site GirlsChannel “said that they wanted a more ‘Japanese’ contestant to represent Japan”.

“However, not everyone thinks that way,” it said. “There were comments supporting her selection, with people saying that the only thing that matters is whether or not she’s a citizen and loves this country or whether or not she was born and raised in Japan.

“Others said criticizing the selection because she wasn’t ‘Japanese’ enough was ‘pathetic’ and outdated thinking.”

Source Article from http://www.qt.com.au/news/miss-universe-japan-criticised-not-japanese-enough/2587553/
Miss Universe Japan criticised as 'not Japanese enough'
http://www.qt.com.au/news/miss-universe-japan-criticised-not-japanese-enough/2587553/
http://news.search.yahoo.com/news/rss?p=japanese%20language
japanese language – Yahoo News Search Results
japanese language – Yahoo News Search Results

Miss Universe Japan criticised as 'not Japanese enough'

木曜日, 3月 26th, 2015

SHE was born and raised in Nagasaki, speaks Japanese as her first language and has a Japanese mother – but Miss Universe contestant Ariana Miyamoto is facing criticism from those who say she is not “Japanese enough”.

The 20-year-old model became the first ever mixed-race beauty pageant winner when she was crown Miss Nagazaki earlier this year, success which has not come without challenges in one of the least racially diverse countries in the world.

Ms Miyamoto grew up in the city of Sasebo near a major US naval base, and her father is an African-American man from Arkansas. She also travelled to the US to go to high school – and some in Japan think all that makes her unfit to represent the nation of her birth.

At 6ft tall in heels, Ms Miyamoto told CNN’s Will Ripley she had always stood out in Japan and that when she was young she was bullied for being different. “In school people used to throw rubbish at me,” she said. “They also used racial slurs.”

In Japan, mixed-race people are known as “hafu”, and after Ms Miyamoto was selected as Miss Universe Japan last week social media users have been asking if it is “ok to choose a hafu to represent Japan?”

According to a translation by the Washington Post, one posted a picture with the caption: “The contradiction that is having a haafu Miss Universe Japan.”

Ms Miyamoto has a Japanese mother and an African-American father.
Ms Miyamoto has a Japanese mother and an African-American father.

Another said: “Even though she’s Miss Universe Japan, her face is foreign no matter how you look at it!”

And a third user tweeted: “Beauty contest. Miss Universe Japan is….wha? What kind of person? She’s ….not…..Japanese…right?”

The view on the ground in Tokyo was similar. Shown a picture of Ms Miyamoto and asked if she could be the country’s Miss Universe contestant, a middle-aged resident named Ishiko Komagawa said: “No, she doesn’t even look Japanese.”

But that view spans generations – high school student Tomoki Nogami said Ms Miyamoto should not be accepted because “half is not 100 per cent Japanese”. “If someone is chosen as Miss Japan both her parents should be Japanese,” he said.

The website Kotaku hailed Ms Miyamoto’s selection as a sign that change was occurring in Japan – if “slowly”. It noted that “many of the highest-rated comments” about Miyamoto on the Japanese site GirlsChannel “said that they wanted a more ‘Japanese’ contestant to represent Japan”.

“However, not everyone thinks that way,” it said. “There were comments supporting her selection, with people saying that the only thing that matters is whether or not she’s a citizen and loves this country or whether or not she was born and raised in Japan.

“Others said criticizing the selection because she wasn’t ‘Japanese’ enough was ‘pathetic’ and outdated thinking.”

Source Article from http://www.qt.com.au/news/miss-universe-japan-criticised-not-japanese-enough/2587553/
Miss Universe Japan criticised as 'not Japanese enough'
http://www.qt.com.au/news/miss-universe-japan-criticised-not-japanese-enough/2587553/
http://news.search.yahoo.com/news/rss?p=japanese%20language
japanese language – Yahoo News Search Results
japanese language – Yahoo News Search Results

Miss Universe Japan criticised as 'not Japanese enough'

木曜日, 3月 26th, 2015

SHE was born and raised in Nagasaki, speaks Japanese as her first language and has a Japanese mother – but Miss Universe contestant Ariana Miyamoto is facing criticism from those who say she is not “Japanese enough”.

The 20-year-old model became the first ever mixed-race beauty pageant winner when she was crown Miss Nagazaki earlier this year, success which has not come without challenges in one of the least racially diverse countries in the world.

Ms Miyamoto grew up in the city of Sasebo near a major US naval base, and her father is an African-American man from Arkansas. She also travelled to the US to go to high school – and some in Japan think all that makes her unfit to represent the nation of her birth.

At 6ft tall in heels, Ms Miyamoto told CNN’s Will Ripley she had always stood out in Japan and that when she was young she was bullied for being different. “In school people used to throw rubbish at me,” she said. “They also used racial slurs.”

In Japan, mixed-race people are known as “hafu”, and after Ms Miyamoto was selected as Miss Universe Japan last week social media users have been asking if it is “ok to choose a hafu to represent Japan?”

According to a translation by the Washington Post, one posted a picture with the caption: “The contradiction that is having a haafu Miss Universe Japan.”

Ms Miyamoto has a Japanese mother and an African-American father.
Ms Miyamoto has a Japanese mother and an African-American father.

Another said: “Even though she’s Miss Universe Japan, her face is foreign no matter how you look at it!”

And a third user tweeted: “Beauty contest. Miss Universe Japan is….wha? What kind of person? She’s ….not…..Japanese…right?”

The view on the ground in Tokyo was similar. Shown a picture of Ms Miyamoto and asked if she could be the country’s Miss Universe contestant, a middle-aged resident named Ishiko Komagawa said: “No, she doesn’t even look Japanese.”

But that view spans generations – high school student Tomoki Nogami said Ms Miyamoto should not be accepted because “half is not 100 per cent Japanese”. “If someone is chosen as Miss Japan both her parents should be Japanese,” he said.

The website Kotaku hailed Ms Miyamoto’s selection as a sign that change was occurring in Japan – if “slowly”. It noted that “many of the highest-rated comments” about Miyamoto on the Japanese site GirlsChannel “said that they wanted a more ‘Japanese’ contestant to represent Japan”.

“However, not everyone thinks that way,” it said. “There were comments supporting her selection, with people saying that the only thing that matters is whether or not she’s a citizen and loves this country or whether or not she was born and raised in Japan.

“Others said criticizing the selection because she wasn’t ‘Japanese’ enough was ‘pathetic’ and outdated thinking.”

Source Article from http://www.qt.com.au/news/miss-universe-japan-criticised-not-japanese-enough/2587553/
Miss Universe Japan criticised as 'not Japanese enough'
http://www.qt.com.au/news/miss-universe-japan-criticised-not-japanese-enough/2587553/
http://news.search.yahoo.com/news/rss?p=japanese%20language
japanese language – Yahoo News Search Results
japanese language – Yahoo News Search Results

Miss Universe Japan criticised as 'not Japanese enough'

木曜日, 3月 26th, 2015

SHE was born and raised in Nagasaki, speaks Japanese as her first language and has a Japanese mother – but Miss Universe contestant Ariana Miyamoto is facing criticism from those who say she is not “Japanese enough”.

The 20-year-old model became the first ever mixed-race beauty pageant winner when she was crown Miss Nagazaki earlier this year, success which has not come without challenges in one of the least racially diverse countries in the world.

Ms Miyamoto grew up in the city of Sasebo near a major US naval base, and her father is an African-American man from Arkansas. She also travelled to the US to go to high school – and some in Japan think all that makes her unfit to represent the nation of her birth.

At 6ft tall in heels, Ms Miyamoto told CNN’s Will Ripley she had always stood out in Japan and that when she was young she was bullied for being different. “In school people used to throw rubbish at me,” she said. “They also used racial slurs.”

In Japan, mixed-race people are known as “hafu”, and after Ms Miyamoto was selected as Miss Universe Japan last week social media users have been asking if it is “ok to choose a hafu to represent Japan?”

According to a translation by the Washington Post, one posted a picture with the caption: “The contradiction that is having a haafu Miss Universe Japan.”

Ms Miyamoto has a Japanese mother and an African-American father.
Ms Miyamoto has a Japanese mother and an African-American father.

Another said: “Even though she’s Miss Universe Japan, her face is foreign no matter how you look at it!”

And a third user tweeted: “Beauty contest. Miss Universe Japan is….wha? What kind of person? She’s ….not…..Japanese…right?”

The view on the ground in Tokyo was similar. Shown a picture of Ms Miyamoto and asked if she could be the country’s Miss Universe contestant, a middle-aged resident named Ishiko Komagawa said: “No, she doesn’t even look Japanese.”

But that view spans generations – high school student Tomoki Nogami said Ms Miyamoto should not be accepted because “half is not 100 per cent Japanese”. “If someone is chosen as Miss Japan both her parents should be Japanese,” he said.

The website Kotaku hailed Ms Miyamoto’s selection as a sign that change was occurring in Japan – if “slowly”. It noted that “many of the highest-rated comments” about Miyamoto on the Japanese site GirlsChannel “said that they wanted a more ‘Japanese’ contestant to represent Japan”.

“However, not everyone thinks that way,” it said. “There were comments supporting her selection, with people saying that the only thing that matters is whether or not she’s a citizen and loves this country or whether or not she was born and raised in Japan.

“Others said criticizing the selection because she wasn’t ‘Japanese’ enough was ‘pathetic’ and outdated thinking.”

Source Article from http://www.qt.com.au/news/miss-universe-japan-criticised-not-japanese-enough/2587553/
Miss Universe Japan criticised as 'not Japanese enough'
http://www.qt.com.au/news/miss-universe-japan-criticised-not-japanese-enough/2587553/
http://news.search.yahoo.com/news/rss?p=japanese%20language
japanese language – Yahoo News Search Results
japanese language – Yahoo News Search Results