Archive for the ‘Japanese Language’ Category

Want to Learn Klingon? Duolingo’s Working on It

土曜日, 4月 11th, 2015

[ Technology]

Popular language tutorial app Duolingo has just added a new language. No, it’s not Japanese (as people have been clamoring over for some time). In fact, this language didn’t even exist 40 years ago.

Duolingo wants to teach you Klingon.

Yep, the language of the Klingons, which first appeared in 1979’s Star Trek: The Motion Picture, will soon be an option on the app. Lest you think this is a joke, do remember that Klingon isn’t a “fictional” language. Sure, it was spawned from a work of fiction – but it’s a real language created by linguist Marc Okrand.

“Klingon is the constructed language spoken by the fictional extraterrestrial Klingon species in the Star Trek universe. Created by Marc Okrand, the language itself is centered around spacecraft, warfare, and weaponry — but it also reflects the directness and sense of humor of the Klingon culture. For example, the closest word you can use to express ‘hello’ is ‘nuqneH,’ which actually means ‘What do you want?’. There are also plenty of insults, as it is considered an art form. The mastery of Klingon is extremely uncommon on Earth. Join the galactic elite and start learning this fascinating language,” says Duolingo.

According to the company, one user is creating the entire course.

On Thursday, Duolingo co-founder Luis von Ahn said the company had “started building a course to learn Klingon”, so the timeframe for the course’s release is uncertain. If you want to be notified when the Klingon course is ready, head here.

Are you excited to learn Klingon? Well, some people aren’t. Comments on reddit and Twitter show many are miffed about Duolingo’s decision to build a Klingon course before, oh let’s say, Japanese (or many other widely-spoken languages).

“Why Klingon, as opposed to another real-world language that you don’t already cover? Don’t get me wrong, I think it’s awesome and I’m not trying to harsh your groove, but I am curious what prompted this particular application of resources,” asks one commenter.

“This is fucking dumb. Put your effort into real languages. What next, Elvish? Where’s the Greek?” says another.

Can’t please everyone, it seems.

Image via Wikimedia Commons



Want to Learn Klingon? Duolingo’s Working on It
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Higher Japanese proficiency urged for foreign nursing care interns

火曜日, 4月 7th, 2015

The Society for Teaching Japanese as a Foreign Language asked the government Monday to toughen a Japanese-language proficiency requirement for foreign nursing care interns.

The request came after an advisory panel for the Health, Labor and Welfare Ministry lowered the requirement for foreigners before undergoing on-the-job training at nursing care facilities in Japan. The ministry is planning to adopt the lower requirement in the fiscal year starting in April 2016.

The lowered requirement describes the proficiency as “understanding basic Japanese words,” against “understanding Japanese words used in daily life to some extent” under the earlier requirement.

“Communication is important for personal nursing care,” said the society’s leader, Sukero Ito, a professor at Tokyo University of Foreign Studies, after he made the request to Keiko Nagaoka, a senior official in the ministry. “The lowered requirement is insufficient.”

Ito also said a system will be required to help interns improve their Japanese proficiency after starting training.

Source Article from http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2015/04/06/national/higher-japanese-proficiency-urged-for-foreign-nursing-care-interns/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=higher-japanese-proficiency-urged-for-foreign-nursing-care-interns
Higher Japanese proficiency urged for foreign nursing care interns
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119 ¥/$ (5 p.m.)

火曜日, 4月 7th, 2015

The Society for Teaching Japanese as a Foreign Language asked the government Monday to toughen a Japanese-language proficiency requirement for foreign nursing care interns.

The request came after an advisory panel for the Health, Labor and Welfare Ministry lowered the requirement for foreigners before undergoing on-the-job training at nursing care facilities in Japan. The ministry is planning to adopt the lower requirement in the fiscal year starting in April 2016.

The lowered requirement describes the proficiency as “understanding basic Japanese words,” against “understanding Japanese words used in daily life to some extent” under the earlier requirement.

“Communication is important for personal nursing care,” said the society’s leader, Sukero Ito, a professor at Tokyo University of Foreign Studies, after he made the request to Keiko Nagaoka, a senior official in the ministry. “The lowered requirement is insufficient.”

Ito also said a system will be required to help interns improve their Japanese proficiency after starting training.

Source Article from http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2015/04/06/national/higher-japanese-proficiency-urged-for-foreign-nursing-care-interns/
119 ¥/$ (5 p.m.)
http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2015/04/06/national/higher-japanese-proficiency-urged-for-foreign-nursing-care-interns/
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japanese language – Yahoo News Search Results
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Mobius Final Fantasy was 'a little too sexy,' watch the redesigned mobile RPG

月曜日, 4月 6th, 2015

Mobius Final Fantasy is headed to Japanese mobile devices this spring, but with a bit less exposed skin than developer Square Enix originally planned.

About 29 minutes into a recent Japanese language presentation about the role-playing game, the developers discussed the protagonist, Wal, and how some of his wardrobe has grown during development.

The amnesia-ridden protagonist arrives in Paramitia shrouded in mystery and soon becomes a warrior in the strange land under siege. During Mobius Final Fantasy, Wal (or whatever players choose to name him) will take on different roles, and those include different wardrobes. The outfit for the first job (pictured below), which exposed Wal’s sides, seems to have been a bit too revealing, according to its developers.

“It’s kind of sexy.”

The creative team’s lighthearted discussion poked fun at their original design for the Onion Swordsman, with a presenter even smiling and covering her eyes when the original costume appeared onscreen. Based on their reassessment and fan feedback after the design was revealed in December, Square Enix added some more material to the outfit, particularly to Wal’s once-exposed sides.

“It’s kind of sexy,” said a presenter, according to Rocket News 24’s translation. “A little too sexy.”

The hourlong presentation included much more information about the game, including an extended look at gameplay. You can see the game in action in the video below, beginning at about 36 minutes in.

Mobius Final Fantasy‘s creators include a host of series veterans, including longtime series producer Yoshinori Kitase. On Square Enix’s teaser site, Kitase writes that the mobile game has a console-sized scope.

“A new era of gaming is here,” he wrote. “We’re crafting a full-scale, high-quality RPG world the likes of which has never been seen on smartphones and tablets.

“This is the end product of longtime Final Fantasy creators bringing the series to mobile — and things will never be the same.”

The upcoming RPG was announced as Mevius Final Fantasy. Square Enix hasn’t announced a Western release.

More from polygon.com:

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Mobius Final Fantasy was 'a little too sexy,' watch the redesigned mobile RPG
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japanese language – Yahoo News Search Results
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Sumo fans' complaint: Too many Mongolian fighters in the sport

月曜日, 4月 6th, 2015

It’s sumo wrestling season again in Japan, but many fans are yearning for a Japanese star to wrestle the championship from foreign-born fighters.

The number of foreign wrestlers, especially in the top classes, has risen in recent years as fewer Japanese are attracted to the sport. While Japanese fans say they admire the foreign-born fighters, with many acquiring Japanese names and speaking the language, they would like to see an end to the domination.

In recent years the sport has seen a streak of champions from Mongolia, Estonia and Bulgaria. The Japan Sumo Association currently lists 25 wrestlers from Mongolia in its list of roughly 600 professional fighters.

“There are too many Mongolians, the next expected grand champion sumo wrestler are first Terunofuji (Haruo), and Ichinojo (Takashi) – all the grand champions may be all Mongolian soon. I really hope Japanese do better as it’d be sad if they were all Mongolians. That said they are really good,” spectator and 39-year-old dance instructor, Izumi Kondo told Reuters.

Another supporter, 71-year-old construction worker Fumio Tamura. who was seen holding the Japanese and Mongolian national flags during a tournament, said: “It’s great that it’s international now. But I am Japanese so I want to see a Japanese grand champion sumo wrestler. We haven’t had one for years.”

The life as a sumo wrestler is less appealing to Japanese today. The conditions are harsh, the training is tough and fighters are forced to live a communal lifestyle with little privacy.

The sumo world is strictly hierarchical. Wrestlers belong to one of around 50 stables and salaries and status depend on their rank. Only those in the top five classes can marry and receive regular salaries – for instance, a yokozuna makes 2.8 million yen (US$34,000) per month.

Hakuho Sho became a legend in the sport earlier this year when he wrestled his way into his 33rd championship, the most in sumo’s recorded history. His opponent on Friday, Harumafuji Kohei, is one of the four Mongolians attaining the rank of grand champion, yokozuna.

There are only 71 yokozunas in the history of professional sumo wrestling, according to the official website of the Japan Sumo Association.

Sumo’s history stretches back about 1,500 years with roots in a religious ritual conducted in Shinto shrines along with prayers for abundant harvests. The early sport was rougher than its modern version, involving boxing and wrestling elements.

But the sport has also been hit by a series of scandals, including hazing and drug-abuse. Former yokozuna Asashoryu Akinori, the first Mongolian grand champion, quit in 2010 following accusations that he had broken a man’s nose in a drunken brawl outside a Tokyo nightclub.

Source Article from http://asiaone.feedsportal.com/c/34151/f/618414/s/45228905/sc/21/l/0Lnews0Basiaone0N0Cnews0Casia0Csumo0Efans0Ecomplaint0Etoo0Emany0Emongolian0Efighters0Esport/story01.htm
Sumo fans' complaint: Too many Mongolian fighters in the sport
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japanese language – Yahoo News Search Results
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Sumo fans' complaint: Too many Mongolian fighters in the sport

月曜日, 4月 6th, 2015

It’s sumo wrestling season again in Japan, but many fans are yearning for a Japanese star to wrestle the championship from foreign-born fighters.

The number of foreign wrestlers, especially in the top classes, has risen in recent years as fewer Japanese are attracted to the sport.

While Japanese fans say they admire the foreign-born fighters, with many acquiring Japanese names and speaking the language, they would like to see an end to the domination.

In recent years the sport has seen a streak of champions from Mongolia, Estonia and Bulgaria. The Japan Sumo Association currently lists 25 wrestlers from Mongolia in its list of roughly 600 professional fighters.

“There are too many Mongolians, the next expected grand champion sumo wrestler are first Terunofuji (Haruo), and Ichinojo (Takashi) – all the grand champions may be all Mongolian soon. I really hope Japanese do better as it’d be sad if they were all Mongolians. That said they are really good,” spectator and 39-year-old dance instructor, Izumi Kondo told Reuters.

Another supporter, 71-year-old construction worker Fumio Tamura. who was seen holding the Japanese and Mongolian national flags during a tournament, said: “It’s great that it’s international now. But I am Japanese so I want to see a Japanese grand champion sumo wrestler. We haven’t had one for years.”

The life as a sumo wrestler is less appealing to Japanese today. The conditions are harsh, the training is tough and fighters are forced to live a communal lifestyle with little privacy.

The sumo world is strictly hierarchical. Wrestlers belong to one of around 50 stables and salaries and status depend on their rank. Only those in the top five classes can marry and receive regular salaries – for instance, a yokozuna makes 2.8 million yen (US$34,000) per month.

Hakuho Sho became a legend in the sport earlier this year when he wrestled his way into his 33rd championship, the most in sumo’s recorded history. His opponent on Friday, Harumafuji Kohei, is one of the four Mongolians attaining the rank of grand champion, yokozuna.

There are only 71 yokozunas in the history of professional sumo wrestling, according to the official website of the Japan Sumo Association.

Sumo’s history stretches back about 1,500 years with roots in a religious ritual conducted in Shinto shrines along with prayers for abundant harvests. The early sport was rougher than its modern version, involving boxing and wrestling elements.

But the sport has also been hit by a series of scandals, including hazing and drug-abuse. Former yokozuna Asashoryu Akinori, the first Mongolian grand champion, quit in 2010 following accusations that he had broken a man’s nose in a drunken brawl outside a Tokyo nightclub.

Source Article from http://asiaone.feedsportal.com/c/34151/f/618414/s/45228905/sc/21/l/0Lnews0Basiaone0N0Cnews0Casia0Csumo0Efans0Ecomplaint0Etoo0Emany0Emongolian0Efighters0Esport/story01.htm
Sumo fans' complaint: Too many Mongolian fighters in the sport
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japanese language – Yahoo News Search Results
japanese language – Yahoo News Search Results

Sumo fans' complaint: Too many Mongolian fighters in the sport

月曜日, 4月 6th, 2015

It’s sumo wrestling season again in Japan, but many fans are yearning for a Japanese star to wrestle the championship from foreign-born fighters.

The number of foreign wrestlers, especially in the top classes, has risen in recent years as fewer Japanese are attracted to the sport.

While Japanese fans say they admire the foreign-born fighters, with many acquiring Japanese names and speaking the language, they would like to see an end to the domination.

In recent years the sport has seen a streak of champions from Mongolia, Estonia and Bulgaria. The Japan Sumo Association currently lists 25 wrestlers from Mongolia in its list of roughly 600 professional fighters.

“There are too many Mongolians, the next expected grand champion sumo wrestler are first Terunofuji (Haruo), and Ichinojo (Takashi) – all the grand champions may be all Mongolian soon. I really hope Japanese do better as it’d be sad if they were all Mongolians. That said they are really good,” spectator and 39-year-old dance instructor, Izumi Kondo told Reuters.

Another supporter, 71-year-old construction worker Fumio Tamura. who was seen holding the Japanese and Mongolian national flags during a tournament, said: “It’s great that it’s international now. But I am Japanese so I want to see a Japanese grand champion sumo wrestler. We haven’t had one for years.”

The life as a sumo wrestler is less appealing to Japanese today. The conditions are harsh, the training is tough and fighters are forced to live a communal lifestyle with little privacy.

The sumo world is strictly hierarchical. Wrestlers belong to one of around 50 stables and salaries and status depend on their rank. Only those in the top five classes can marry and receive regular salaries – for instance, a yokozuna makes 2.8 million yen (US$34,000) per month.

Hakuho Sho became a legend in the sport earlier this year when he wrestled his way into his 33rd championship, the most in sumo’s recorded history. His opponent on Friday, Harumafuji Kohei, is one of the four Mongolians attaining the rank of grand champion, yokozuna.

There are only 71 yokozunas in the history of professional sumo wrestling, according to the official website of the Japan Sumo Association.

Sumo’s history stretches back about 1,500 years with roots in a religious ritual conducted in Shinto shrines along with prayers for abundant harvests. The early sport was rougher than its modern version, involving boxing and wrestling elements.

But the sport has also been hit by a series of scandals, including hazing and drug-abuse. Former yokozuna Asashoryu Akinori, the first Mongolian grand champion, quit in 2010 following accusations that he had broken a man’s nose in a drunken brawl outside a Tokyo nightclub.

Source Article from http://asiaone.feedsportal.com/c/34151/f/618414/s/45228905/sc/21/l/0Lnews0Basiaone0N0Cnews0Casia0Csumo0Efans0Ecomplaint0Etoo0Emany0Emongolian0Efighters0Esport/story01.htm
Sumo fans' complaint: Too many Mongolian fighters in the sport
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japanese language – Yahoo News Search Results
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Sumo fans' complaint: Too many Mongolian fighters in the sport

月曜日, 4月 6th, 2015

It’s sumo wrestling season again in Japan, but many fans are yearning for a Japanese star to wrestle the championship from foreign-born fighters.

The number of foreign wrestlers, especially in the top classes, has risen in recent years as fewer Japanese are attracted to the sport.

While Japanese fans say they admire the foreign-born fighters, with many acquiring Japanese names and speaking the language, they would like to see an end to the domination.

In recent years the sport has seen a streak of champions from Mongolia, Estonia and Bulgaria. The Japan Sumo Association currently lists 25 wrestlers from Mongolia in its list of roughly 600 professional fighters.

“There are too many Mongolians, the next expected grand champion sumo wrestler are first Terunofuji (Haruo), and Ichinojo (Takashi) – all the grand champions may be all Mongolian soon. I really hope Japanese do better as it’d be sad if they were all Mongolians. That said they are really good,” spectator and 39-year-old dance instructor, Izumi Kondo told Reuters.

Another supporter, 71-year-old construction worker Fumio Tamura. who was seen holding the Japanese and Mongolian national flags during a tournament, said: “It’s great that it’s international now. But I am Japanese so I want to see a Japanese grand champion sumo wrestler. We haven’t had one for years.”

The life as a sumo wrestler is less appealing to Japanese today. The conditions are harsh, the training is tough and fighters are forced to live a communal lifestyle with little privacy.

The sumo world is strictly hierarchical. Wrestlers belong to one of around 50 stables and salaries and status depend on their rank. Only those in the top five classes can marry and receive regular salaries – for instance, a yokozuna makes 2.8 million yen (US$34,000) per month.

Hakuho Sho became a legend in the sport earlier this year when he wrestled his way into his 33rd championship, the most in sumo’s recorded history. His opponent on Friday, Harumafuji Kohei, is one of the four Mongolians attaining the rank of grand champion, yokozuna.

There are only 71 yokozunas in the history of professional sumo wrestling, according to the official website of the Japan Sumo Association.

Sumo’s history stretches back about 1,500 years with roots in a religious ritual conducted in Shinto shrines along with prayers for abundant harvests. The early sport was rougher than its modern version, involving boxing and wrestling elements.

But the sport has also been hit by a series of scandals, including hazing and drug-abuse. Former yokozuna Asashoryu Akinori, the first Mongolian grand champion, quit in 2010 following accusations that he had broken a man’s nose in a drunken brawl outside a Tokyo nightclub.

Source Article from http://asiaone.feedsportal.com/c/34151/f/618414/s/45228905/sc/21/l/0Lnews0Basiaone0N0Cnews0Casia0Csumo0Efans0Ecomplaint0Etoo0Emany0Emongolian0Efighters0Esport/story01.htm
Sumo fans' complaint: Too many Mongolian fighters in the sport
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japanese language – Yahoo News Search Results
japanese language – Yahoo News Search Results

Sumo fans' complaint: Too many Mongolian fighters in the sport

月曜日, 4月 6th, 2015

It’s sumo wrestling season again in Japan, but many fans are yearning for a Japanese star to wrestle the championship from foreign-born fighters.

The number of foreign wrestlers, especially in the top classes, has risen in recent years as fewer Japanese are attracted to the sport.

While Japanese fans say they admire the foreign-born fighters, with many acquiring Japanese names and speaking the language, they would like to see an end to the domination.

In recent years the sport has seen a streak of champions from Mongolia, Estonia and Bulgaria. The Japan Sumo Association currently lists 25 wrestlers from Mongolia in its list of roughly 600 professional fighters.

“There are too many Mongolians, the next expected grand champion sumo wrestler are first Terunofuji (Haruo), and Ichinojo (Takashi) – all the grand champions may be all Mongolian soon. I really hope Japanese do better as it’d be sad if they were all Mongolians. That said they are really good,” spectator and 39-year-old dance instructor, Izumi Kondo told Reuters.

Another supporter, 71-year-old construction worker Fumio Tamura. who was seen holding the Japanese and Mongolian national flags during a tournament, said: “It’s great that it’s international now. But I am Japanese so I want to see a Japanese grand champion sumo wrestler. We haven’t had one for years.”

The life as a sumo wrestler is less appealing to Japanese today. The conditions are harsh, the training is tough and fighters are forced to live a communal lifestyle with little privacy.

The sumo world is strictly hierarchical. Wrestlers belong to one of around 50 stables and salaries and status depend on their rank. Only those in the top five classes can marry and receive regular salaries – for instance, a yokozuna makes 2.8 million yen (US$34,000) per month.

Hakuho Sho became a legend in the sport earlier this year when he wrestled his way into his 33rd championship, the most in sumo’s recorded history. His opponent on Friday, Harumafuji Kohei, is one of the four Mongolians attaining the rank of grand champion, yokozuna.

There are only 71 yokozunas in the history of professional sumo wrestling, according to the official website of the Japan Sumo Association.

Sumo’s history stretches back about 1,500 years with roots in a religious ritual conducted in Shinto shrines along with prayers for abundant harvests. The early sport was rougher than its modern version, involving boxing and wrestling elements.

But the sport has also been hit by a series of scandals, including hazing and drug-abuse. Former yokozuna Asashoryu Akinori, the first Mongolian grand champion, quit in 2010 following accusations that he had broken a man’s nose in a drunken brawl outside a Tokyo nightclub.

Source Article from http://asiaone.feedsportal.com/c/34151/f/618414/s/45228905/sc/21/l/0Lnews0Basiaone0N0Cnews0Casia0Csumo0Efans0Ecomplaint0Etoo0Emany0Emongolian0Efighters0Esport/story01.htm
Sumo fans' complaint: Too many Mongolian fighters in the sport
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japanese language – Yahoo News Search Results
japanese language – Yahoo News Search Results

Sumo fans' complaint: Too many Mongolian fighters in the sport

月曜日, 4月 6th, 2015

It’s sumo wrestling season again in Japan, but many fans are yearning for a Japanese star to wrestle the championship from foreign-born fighters.

The number of foreign wrestlers, especially in the top classes, has risen in recent years as fewer Japanese are attracted to the sport.

While Japanese fans say they admire the foreign-born fighters, with many acquiring Japanese names and speaking the language, they would like to see an end to the domination.

In recent years the sport has seen a streak of champions from Mongolia, Estonia and Bulgaria. The Japan Sumo Association currently lists 25 wrestlers from Mongolia in its list of roughly 600 professional fighters.

“There are too many Mongolians, the next expected grand champion sumo wrestler are first Terunofuji (Haruo), and Ichinojo (Takashi) – all the grand champions may be all Mongolian soon. I really hope Japanese do better as it’d be sad if they were all Mongolians. That said they are really good,” spectator and 39-year-old dance instructor, Izumi Kondo told Reuters.

Another supporter, 71-year-old construction worker Fumio Tamura. who was seen holding the Japanese and Mongolian national flags during a tournament, said: “It’s great that it’s international now. But I am Japanese so I want to see a Japanese grand champion sumo wrestler. We haven’t had one for years.”

The life as a sumo wrestler is less appealing to Japanese today. The conditions are harsh, the training is tough and fighters are forced to live a communal lifestyle with little privacy.

The sumo world is strictly hierarchical. Wrestlers belong to one of around 50 stables and salaries and status depend on their rank. Only those in the top five classes can marry and receive regular salaries – for instance, a yokozuna makes 2.8 million yen (US$34,000) per month.

Hakuho Sho became a legend in the sport earlier this year when he wrestled his way into his 33rd championship, the most in sumo’s recorded history. His opponent on Friday, Harumafuji Kohei, is one of the four Mongolians attaining the rank of grand champion, yokozuna.

There are only 71 yokozunas in the history of professional sumo wrestling, according to the official website of the Japan Sumo Association.

Sumo’s history stretches back about 1,500 years with roots in a religious ritual conducted in Shinto shrines along with prayers for abundant harvests. The early sport was rougher than its modern version, involving boxing and wrestling elements.

But the sport has also been hit by a series of scandals, including hazing and drug-abuse. Former yokozuna Asashoryu Akinori, the first Mongolian grand champion, quit in 2010 following accusations that he had broken a man’s nose in a drunken brawl outside a Tokyo nightclub.

Source Article from http://asiaone.feedsportal.com/c/34151/f/618414/s/45228905/sc/21/l/0Lnews0Basiaone0N0Cnews0Casia0Csumo0Efans0Ecomplaint0Etoo0Emany0Emongolian0Efighters0Esport/story01.htm
Sumo fans' complaint: Too many Mongolian fighters in the sport
http://asiaone.feedsportal.com/c/34151/f/618414/s/45228905/sc/21/l/0Lnews0Basiaone0N0Cnews0Casia0Csumo0Efans0Ecomplaint0Etoo0Emany0Emongolian0Efighters0Esport/story01.htm
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japanese language – Yahoo News Search Results
japanese language – Yahoo News Search Results