Archive for the ‘Japanese Class’ Category

Japanese shares near 15-year high

水曜日, 4月 8th, 2015

Japan shares

Japan’s shares neared a 15-year high on Wednesday

Japan’s shares neared a 15-year high on Wednesday after the Bank of Japan (BOJ) maintained its asset purchase program in an effort to boost the economy.

In Tokyo, benchmark Nikkei 225 index was up 0.4% at 19,723.42.

The central bank has unchanged its policy since expanding stimulus in October to deal with the impact of slumping oil prices and easing inflation on Japan’s growth.

Hong Kong’s Hang Seng index was up 2.4% at 25,874.53 after a four-day break.

Investors welcomed speculation that the US Federal Reserve may put off raising rates in the short term following disappointing jobs data released last week.

Shares of train makers China CNR and CSR jumped 33% after they received regulatory approval to merge after the plans were announced in December.

Their shares had been suspended from trading since 30 March.

On the mainland, the Shanghai Composite was down 1.04% at 3,920.22 after its highest finish since March 2008 on Tuesday.

In Australia, the benchmark S&P/ASX 200 index was up 0.40% at 5,949.50.

Shares of ANZ were down 0.5% despite news that it won an appeal against a court ruling that some of its credit card fees were unfair after thousands of customers launched Australia biggest ever class action lawsuit.

In South Korea, the benchmark Kospi index was up 0.44% at 2,056.05.

Source Article from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-32213924
Japanese shares near 15-year high
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Submitting yourself to the 50 shades of arigatō gozaimasu

月曜日, 3月 30th, 2015

Do you remember the first day of Japanese class or the first day you resolved to finally learn the language on your own? What about the very first Japanese words you ever learned? There’s a good chance arigatō gozaimasu (ありがとうございます) were those first words and/or you learned them on that first day of study. Of course the Japanese words for “thank you” are so widely known that you may not even have needed to “learn” them — they might have been something you were already aware of.

Unfortunately, however, many students’ ability to express their appreciation never expands beyond this single phrase. Learning how to diversify the ways of saying “thanks” will allow you to be appreciative more naturally in many different situations.

Sure, we can attach the all-purpose adverb dōmo (どうも; to a great extent) to the front to give us dōmo arigatō gozaimasu (どうもありがとうございま; thank you very much), thereby drawing out the number of syllables and, thus, the level of politeness just slightly, and dōmo arigatō alone is serviceable in more casual situations. But these variations don’t really give us anything beyond what we already know.

We can also turn the phrase into past tense: arigatō gozaimashita (ありがとうございました). This is useful after someone has completed something for you. For example, an audience has politely attended a conference until the very end, you have completed a phone call with a service representative or someone has returned a dropped wallet to you. However, this should be used with caution in a business atmosphere as some companies ask workers to use present tense so as not to imply a completion of their relationship with a client — they are hoping for continued happy returns in the future.

Dōmo will do fine in casual situations to express a quick thanks, but it also latches on easily to sumimasen (すみません) as well. While dōmo sumimasen is often used to mean “Excuse me” or “I’m sorry,” it is also used when receiving unexpected favors, such as when someone holds the door or otherwise goes out of their way to be helpful.

In this same sense, the word kyōshuku (恐縮; to be obliged or to trouble) also has a split personality. It has a negative quality to it, and used at the front of a sentence it can be a great way to apologize before making a request of someone: “Kyōshuku desu ga, gomeiwaku de nakereba, chotto tesudatte itadakemasen deshō ka?” (「恐縮ですが、ご迷惑でなければちょっと手伝っていただけませんでしょうか」; “It’s terrible of me, but if it isn’t too much trouble, could I ask you to help me for a minute?”)

As with sumimasen, kyōshuku can be considered an extremely polite and respectful way to show appreciation for an unexpected situation, in this case unexpected praise. When I taught at a Japanese junior high school, the woman who helped organize and serve the town’s kyūshoku (給食, school lunches) was a wonderful person, a hard worker and legitimately interested in making sure the students had a diverse selection of delicious, healthy meals.

At one point, she was recognized unexpectedly for her work in front of the school during a meeting. At the mention of her name, she turned bright red and was clearly a little embarrassed. The first words out of her mouth were “Kyōshuku desu” (「恐縮です」; “I’m terribly obliged”). This is a great way to humbly accept praise and express your appreciation for it. Note that kyōshuku and kyūshoku are remarkably similar — just with the first o and u swapped around — so be sure not to mistake them.

A more direct variation of thank you is tasukarimasu (助かります), which literally means “I am/will be helped.” This is most frequently expressed in the past tense tasukarimashita (助かりました), which should be used right after someone has helped you in some way and means something along the lines of “I appreciate the help” or “That was a big help.” You can use present tense tasukarimasu when someone is agreeing to do a favor to express that you will really appreciate what they are about to do.

And if you want to thank people like Solid Snake from the “Metal Gear Solid” video-game franchise, the phrase you are looking for is kari ga dekita (借りができた; I owe you one). A search in Google shows over 84,000 hits for this phrase, but only 21,000 for the more polite distal form kari ga dekimashita, which suggests that this phrase is quite casual and not something you should bust out in front of the boss man. Save it for your comrades in arms.

Of course, you don’t always have to reinvent the wheel every time you say thank you. This is proven by karaoke classics that feature arigatō.

Yujiro Ishihara’s “Yogiri yo konya mo arigatō” (「夜霧よ今夜もありがとう」; literally, “Thank you Again, Tonight, Night Fog”) is a classic that is slow enough for beginners and perfect for those of us cursed with hikui koe (低い声, deep voices). In the song, two lovebirds thank the yogiri (夜霧, night fog) for covering the pain while they’re apart.

And Yoshi Ikuzo, the man with the best stage name in all of Japan (it’s a homonym for “Here we go!”), has the more epic song “Arigatō no Uta” (「ありがとうの唄」; “The thank you song”) in which Ikuzo thanks things for giving him courage. It’s a great song that helps students note how the particle wo (を) is used to mark something for which someone is thankful, in this case “Yūki wo arigatō” (「勇気をありがとう」; “Thank you for the courage”). You can copy this structure in your everyday life with phrases such as messēji wo arigatō (メッセージをありがとう; thank you for the message).

Varying the way you say “thank you” is an easy way to sound more natural and native with Japanese. These are a good start, but language students should always aim to be gluttons for punishment: You should never be satisfied with what you have; continue to tease out another fifty shades of arigatō that aren’t yet in your arsenal.

Source Article from http://www.japantimes.co.jp/life/2015/03/30/language/submitting-50-shades-arigato-gozaimasu/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=submitting-50-shades-arigato-gozaimasu
Submitting yourself to the 50 shades of arigatō gozaimasu
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Japanese Class – Yahoo News Search Results
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119.69 ¥/$ (5 p.m.)

月曜日, 3月 30th, 2015

Do you remember the first day of Japanese class or the first day you resolved to finally learn the language on your own? What about the very first Japanese words you ever learned? There’s a good chance arigatō gozaimasu (ありがとうございます) were those first words and/or you learned them on that first day of study. Of course the Japanese words for “thank you” are so widely known that you may not even have needed to “learn” them — they might have been something you were already aware of.

Unfortunately, however, many students’ ability to express their appreciation never expands beyond this single phrase. Learning how to diversify the ways of saying “thanks” will allow you to be appreciative more naturally in many different situations.

Sure, we can attach the all-purpose adverb dōmo (どうも; to a great extent) to the front to give us dōmo arigatō gozaimasu (どうもありがとうございま; thank you very much), thereby drawing out the number of syllables and, thus, the level of politeness just slightly, and dōmo arigatō alone is serviceable in more casual situations. But these variations don’t really give us anything beyond what we already know.

We can also turn the phrase into past tense: arigatō gozaimashita (ありがとうございました). This is useful after someone has completed something for you. For example, an audience has politely attended a conference until the very end, you have completed a phone call with a service representative or someone has returned a dropped wallet to you. However, this should be used with caution in a business atmosphere as some companies ask workers to use present tense so as not to imply a completion of their relationship with a client — they are hoping for continued happy returns in the future.

Dōmo will do fine in casual situations to express a quick thanks, but it also latches on easily to sumimasen (すみません) as well. While dōmo sumimasen is often used to mean “Excuse me” or “I’m sorry,” it is also used when receiving unexpected favors, such as when someone holds the door or otherwise goes out of their way to be helpful.

In this same sense, the word kyōshuku (恐縮; to be obliged or to trouble) also has a split personality. It has a negative quality to it, and used at the front of a sentence it can be a great way to apologize before making a request of someone: “Kyōshuku desu ga, gomeiwaku de nakereba, chotto tesudatte itadakemasen deshō ka?” (「恐縮ですが、ご迷惑でなければちょっと手伝っていただけませんでしょうか」; “It’s terrible of me, but if it isn’t too much trouble, could I ask you to help me for a minute?”)

As with sumimasen, kyōshuku can be considered an extremely polite and respectful way to show appreciation for an unexpected situation, in this case unexpected praise. When I taught at a Japanese junior high school, the woman who helped organize and serve the town’s kyūshoku (給食, school lunches) was a wonderful person, a hard worker and legitimately interested in making sure the students had a diverse selection of delicious, healthy meals.

At one point, she was recognized unexpectedly for her work in front of the school during a meeting. At the mention of her name, she turned bright red and was clearly a little embarrassed. The first words out of her mouth were “Kyōshuku desu” (「恐縮です」; “I’m terribly obliged”). This is a great way to humbly accept praise and express your appreciation for it. Note that kyōshuku and kyūshoku are remarkably similar — just with the first o and u swapped around — so be sure not to mistake them.

A more direct variation of thank you is tasukarimasu (助かります), which literally means “I am/will be helped.” This is most frequently expressed in the past tense tasukarimashita (助かりました), which should be used right after someone has helped you in some way and means something along the lines of “I appreciate the help” or “That was a big help.” You can use present tense tasukarimasu when someone is agreeing to do a favor to express that you will really appreciate what they are about to do.

And if you want to thank people like Solid Snake from the “Metal Gear Solid” video-game franchise, the phrase you are looking for is kari ga dekita (借りができた; I owe you one). A search in Google shows over 84,000 hits for this phrase, but only 21,000 for the more polite distal form kari ga dekimashita, which suggests that this phrase is quite casual and not something you should bust out in front of the boss man. Save it for your comrades in arms.

Of course, you don’t always have to reinvent the wheel every time you say thank you. This is proven by karaoke classics that feature arigatō.

Yujiro Ishihara’s “Yogiri yo konya mo arigatō” (「夜霧よ今夜もありがとう」; literally, “Thank you Again, Tonight, Night Fog”) is a classic that is slow enough for beginners and perfect for those of us cursed with hikui koe (低い声, deep voices). In the song, two lovebirds thank the yogiri (夜霧, night fog) for covering the pain while they’re apart.

And Yoshi Ikuzo, the man with the best stage name in all of Japan (it’s a homonym for “Here we go!”), has the more epic song “Arigatō no Uta” (「ありがとうの唄」; “The thank you song”) in which Ikuzo thanks things for giving him courage. It’s a great song that helps students note how the particle wo (を) is used to mark something for which someone is thankful, in this case “Yūki wo arigatō” (「勇気をありがとう」; “Thank you for the courage”). You can copy this structure in your everyday life with phrases such as messēji wo arigatō (メッセージをありがとう; thank you for the message).

Varying the way you say “thank you” is an easy way to sound more natural and native with Japanese. These are a good start, but language students should always aim to be gluttons for punishment: You should never be satisfied with what you have; continue to tease out another fifty shades of arigatō that aren’t yet in your arsenal.

Source Article from http://www.japantimes.co.jp/life/2015/03/30/language/submitting-50-shades-arigato-gozaimasu/
119.69 ¥/$ (5 p.m.)
http://www.japantimes.co.jp/life/2015/03/30/language/submitting-50-shades-arigato-gozaimasu/
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Japanese Class – Yahoo News Search Results
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Takata sued for US$1.9b in Canada over faulty airbags

土曜日, 3月 28th, 2015

OTTAWA: Canadian drivers have launched three class action lawsuits against embattled Japanese auto supplier Takata over defective airbags linked to at least five fatalities worldwide, lawyers confirmed on Friday (Mar 27).

The plaintiffs are seeking a total of Can$2.4 billion (US$1.9 billion, S$2.6 billion) for personal injuries, car repairs and an expected loss in value of their vehicles included in a massive global safety recall, Merchant Law Group LLP lead partner Tony Merchant told AFP.

In addition to Merchant, two other Canadian law firms have launched suits, and a fourth is considering doing so.

If they are certified by a judge, they would likely be lumped into a single class action lawsuit in the coming months.

About 20 million vehicles produced by some of the world’s biggest automakers are being recalled due to the risk their Takata-made airbags could deploy with excessive explosive power, spraying potentially fatal shrapnel into the vehicle. The problem has been linked to at least five deaths globally, with a sixth death under investigation.

“They’re making products that are like grenades going off,” Merchant told AFP. “These things are supposed to bring safety and instead they’re a danger.”

The Canadian litigation involves 400,000 vehicles equipped with Takata airbags.

Potentially affected automakers include Acura, BMW, Chrysler, Dodge/Ram, Ford, Honda, Infiniti, Lexus, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Nissan, Pontiac, Subaru and Toyota.

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Takata sued for US$1.9b in Canada over faulty airbags
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Japan should be flexible in Australian submarine tender: retired Japanese admiral

木曜日, 3月 26th, 2015

By Matt Siegel

ADELAIDE, Australia (Reuters) – At least some of Australia’s new submarine fleet should be built in the country, an influential retired Japanese admiral said on Thursday, signaling a possible softening in Japan’s position on the controversial A$50 billion ($39 billion) project.

Speaking on the sidelines of a conference of Australian naval officials, defense contractors and industry groups in Adelaide, retired Vice Admiral Yoji Koda said Japan should work with Australia to develop and maintain a submarine capability.

“At least some boats should be built in this country,” said Koda, who is close to Japan’s defense establishment.

“I used to be heavily involved in defense force planning … Maybe the best way is proportional to the number of ships to be built,” Koda told Reuters at the Future Submarine Summit, suggesting that perhaps only the first of up to a dozen submarines would be built in Japan.

Japan had been the frontrunner to replace Australia’s aging Collins-class submarines with an off-the-shelf version of its 4,000-tonne Soryu-class vessel after Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott agreed to cooperate on military technology with his Japanese counterpart Shinzo Abe last June.

But during an internal challenge to his leadership in February, Abbott promised something closer to an open tender to be completed by the year-end in an attempt to shore up political support.

Japan, Germany and France have now been invited to join a 10-month “competitive evaluation process” after which the Defence Department would advise the government on preferred bidders.

Asked in Tokyo about Koda’s remarks, Admiral Katsutoshi Kawano, chief of the Self Defence Forces’ Joint Staff, told Reuters he had little to say on the issue.

Another retired Japanese admiral at the Adelaide conference, Vice Admiral Masao Kobayashi, echoed the willingness to be flexible in a speech earlier in the day, saying it was “not very difficult” to imagine building submarines in Australia.

Sources had said Japan, only just coming out of a decades-old ban on arms exports, was reluctant to engage in a tender partly to avoid getting embroiled in a bidding war. It was also wary of undertaking significant construction in Australia because of concerns about sensitive technology.

John Bruni, a co-organizer of the submarine conference and director of Sage International, an Australian think tank, called Koda’s comments a “game changer”.

“That’s confirmation from someone who is relatively senior in the Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force, and it gives heart to local industry that if we are going to accept the Japanese design, we could actually do most of the work here,” he told Reuters.

Adelaide is home to state-owned shipbuilder ASC.

No current Japanese defense officials are at the conference while the makers of the Soryu-class boats, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries <7011.T> and Kawasaki Heavy Industries <7012.T>, rebuffed an invitation to attend.

($1 = 1.2791 Australian dollars)

(Additional reporting by Nobuhiro Kubo and Tim Kelly in TOKYO; Writing by Lincoln Feast in SYDNEY; Editing by Dean Yates)

Source Article from http://news.yahoo.com/japan-flexible-australian-submarine-tender-retired-japanese-admiral-063447320–sector.html
Japan should be flexible in Australian submarine tender: retired Japanese admiral
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Japanese military commissions helicopter carrier in Yokosuka

木曜日, 3月 26th, 2015


The Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force commissioned its largest-ever helicopter carrier Wednesday in Yokohama as officials denied that the massive vessel could be used as a conventional aircraft carrier or represents a prototype for one in the future.


The 248-meter Izumo, which has a displacement of 19,500 tons and is officially classified as a “helicopter destroyer,” resembles an aircraft carrier at first glance.


It has a flat flight deck with a single superstructure, which contains the bridge. The deck is large and robust enough to permit the operation of Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft, JMSDF officers said.


The U.S. military has deployed Ospreys in Japan and the Ground Self-Defense Force is considering procuring the aircraft.


Addressing reporters after the commissioning ceremony in Yokohama on Wednesday, Japan’s Defense Minister Gen Nakatani emphasized that the ship is designed to carry patrol helicopters, not fixed-wing aircraft such as fighter planes.


“We are not thinking about using this as an aircraft carrier,” Nakatani said.


For years, the government has interpreted the war-renouncing Constitution as allowing Japan to possess the minimum necessary forces for self-defense, not offense. This means the nation is not permitted to operate aircraft carriers designed to attack foreign adversaries, the government has said.


Still, experts and media outlets in China and South Korea have speculated Japan may be aiming to operate such an aircraft carrier without declaring it as such.


Nakatani pointed out that the Izumo doesn’t have a runway from which multiple airplanes can take off. It also lacks the hangers and workshops needed to service airplanes.


Instead, it is equipped with equipment for nonmilitary rescue missions, such as surgical theaters and rooms to accommodate evacuees and aid supplies, Nakatani said.


Military experts support this view, saying the vessel would require a comprehensive refit before it could operate jet fighters or other attack airplanes.


The Izumo is the first ship in the Izumo class of helicopter carrier. It can carry seven anti-submarine patrol helicopters, plus two rescue and transport helicopters. Its total crew will number 470.


The ship took three years and two months to build at a cost of ¥120 billion. Its home port will be the MSDF base in Yokosuka, Kanagawa Prefecture.


In a speech to the crew, Nakatani said he believes the Izumo will greatly enhance the MSDF’s capabilities to cope with military threats and contingencies as well as contribute to international peace-keeping and overseas rescue missions.


“In reality, now no country alone can maintain peace and safety on its own,” Nakatani said as crew members stood on the flight deck.


For Japan, “it’s more important than ever to actively contribute to peace and stability of the world,” he said.


The MSDF’s previous largest helicopter carrier was the Hyuga class, at 197 meters in length and with a displacement of 13,950 tons.


The Hyuga class can carry three patrol helicopters and one rescue and transport helicopter, according to the MSDF.


Asked why Japan requires a helicopter carrier larger than the Hyuga class, Nakatani said a larger ship is needed to accommodate facilities and equipment for joint operations involving the air, ground and maritime branches of the Self-Defense Forces.


“With joint operations, we can more quickly and flexibly cope with situations,” he said. “The ship should have command functions for such an operation. That’s why (the Izumo) must be this large.”


———


©2015 the Japan Times (Tokyo)


Visit the Japan Times (Tokyo) at www.japantimes.co.jp/


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Japanese military commissions helicopter carrier in Yokosuka
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Abe at US Congress

月曜日, 3月 23rd, 2015

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Abe at US Congress
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Japan firms to be a surprise no-show at Australian submarine event

月曜日, 3月 23rd, 2015

By Tim Kelly and Nobuhiro Kubo

TOKYO (Reuters) – Two Japanese firms that until recently were the frontrunners to win a multi-billion dollar contract to build Australia’s new submarines have rebuffed an invitation to attend a gathering of top Australian naval officials and politicians this week.

The no-show by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and Kawasaki Heavy Industries at an event called Australia’s Future Submarine Summit, held amid intensifying competition for the deal, exposes a potential weak link in Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s more muscular security agenda: Japan Inc.

While Abe wants Japanese firms to vie for overseas orders after he lifted a decades-old ban on arms exports last year, such companies are showing little appetite for doing business in foreign markets after being restricted to local sales for so long, Japanese defense officials and experts said.

That isolation, imposed after Japan’s defeat in World War Two, has left the country’s industrial heavyweights with few contacts in foreign defense departments and made weapons a small part of their operations. Experts say they also worry about being called “merchants of death” at home, where Japan’s wartime role remains a sensitive issue, should they start selling state-of-the-art weapons abroad.

“Winning deals overseas means having to develop contacts in foreign governments or seek joint ventures, and that is a bit much for them, so they are holding back,” said a Japanese Defence Ministry official who declined to be identified.

A source involved in organizing the conference in Adelaide said Mitsubishi Heavy and Kawasaki Heavy, makers of the Soryu-class stealth submarines, had declined an invitation.

Australian Defence Minister Kevin Andrews and senior naval officials will attend the two-day event, which starts on Wednesday. A decision on the submarine project, worth A$50 billion ($38.8 billion) over the life of the vessels, is expected by the year-end.

“We don’t plan to send anyone. The sub issue is in the hands of Japan’s Defence Ministry,” said a spokeswoman for Kawasaki Heavy. A Mitsubishi Heavy spokesman added: “We aren’t sending anybody.” They declined to elaborate.

POLITICS

Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott had pledged ahead of his election in 2013 that up to 12 submarines would be built at state-owned shipbuilder ASC in Adelaide, before back-pedaling by signaling that cost and timely delivery were paramount.

After Australia and Japan agreed in June to cooperate on military technology, sources said Canberra began leaning towards buying an off-the-shelf version of the 4,000-tonne Soryu-class submarine to replace six ageing Collins-class vessels.

Abbott’s government ruled out an open tender in December, appearing to put Japan in the box seat.

But Abbott then came under growing pressure from labor unions and the main opposition party, which both demanded a local build to boost Australia’s languishing manufacturing industry.

Just before an internal challenge to his leadership in February, which he survived, Abbott promised something closer to an open tender in an attempt to shore up political support.

The reluctance of Mitsubishi and Kawasaki to chase Australia’s biggest defense deal – they have let the Japanese government play the lead role in talks with Canberra up to now, according to Japanese Defence Ministry officials – is in contrast to Germany’s ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems.

ThyssenKrupp, along with France’s state-controlled naval contractor DCNS, have both expressed interest in the tender and said they would build in Australia.

Delegations from ThyssenKrupp have visited Canberra in recent months.

A ThyssenKrupp spokesman said the company would be represented at the conference. The event’s leading corporate sponsor is Siemens AG, which makes electrical engines and fuel cells for ThyssenKrupp’s submarines.

Abbott has also thrown open the tender, which he has called a “competitive evaluation process”, to ASC.

“The sense I’m getting from Australia is that the competitive evaluation is weighted in Japan’s favor, but it requires a proactive industrial approach,” said a defense industry source who will attend the Adelaide meeting. “It’s Japan’s to lose unless they wake up to the opportunity.”

MISGIVINGS

Dismantled by the United States after World War Two, Japan’s defense industry re-emerged as a patchwork of manufacturers. At Mitsubishi Heavy, the biggest, defense accounts for just a tenth of revenue.

Corporate misgivings were on show at a Defence Ministry seminar in Tokyo in July to explain the end of the arms export ban three months earlier.

“Defence managers don’t have much influence. Risky projects aren’t going to make it past the board,” one participant told Reuters at the event.

“No company has defense sales of more than 10 percent of overall revenue, there is a lot of resistance to doing anything new,” said another.

Such reluctance has already stalled one potential breakthrough export deal.

Mitsubishi Heavy at the start of 2014 entered a tentative agreement with Britain’s BAE Systems PLC, which is helping build Lockheed Martin Corp’s F-35 stealth fighter, to supply rear fuselage components.

Unwilling to risk losing money on a tightly priced deal Mitsubishi withdrew, sources familiar with the talks told Reuters at the time.

“We need to get one or two successful deals done,” said the Japanese Defence Ministry official.

(Additional reporting by Matt Siegel in SYDNEY and Georgina Prodhan in FRANKFURT; Editing by Dean Yates and Alex Richardson)

Source Article from http://news.yahoo.com/japan-firms-surprise-no-show-australian-submarine-event-210344748–sector.html
Japan firms to be a surprise no-show at Australian submarine event
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Japanese tops inter schools golf tourney

月曜日, 3月 16th, 2015

South Luzon Tollway Corp. (SLTC), operator of the South Luzon Expressway (SLEX), is going to tap the bond market in order to raise funds for its P7.15 billion maturing debt, a Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) document showed. SLEX, which is 36.1 kilometer long spanning from Alabang, Muntinlupa to Sto. Tomas, Batangas, is one of the three major expressways that link Metro Manila to southern province of the Philippines. …

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Japanese tops inter schools golf tourney
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Japanese Class – Yahoo News Search Results
Japanese Class – Yahoo News Search Results

Japanese students take over Moreton Bay Boys' College | Video

土曜日, 3月 14th, 2015

Moreton Bay Boys’ College boys learn intricate details of Japanese culture

VIDEO: Year 10 MBBC student Finley Williams and Takayuki Akioka.

This week Moreton Bay Boys’ College played host to its sister school Higashiohtani School located just outside of Osaka, Japan.

The boys are being billeted with local families and joining their MBBC students in an Australian class room for nine days. They will then continue on a cultural tour of Australia. While in Queensland the boys will also make a visit to a local wildlife park and also a trip to the Gold Coast.

: Year 10 MBBC student Finley Williams and Takayuki Akioka.

: Year 10 MBBC student Finley Williams and Takayuki Akioka.

This week the MBBC boys have been learning the intricate details of Japanese culture, in this class the boys learned how to write their names with a Japanese brush and ink on to rice paper. They learned the ancient art of origami and read Japanese comics.

Much laughter was shared and firm friendships are developing!

Source Article from http://www.redlandcitybulletin.com.au/story/2943239/japanese-students-take-over-moreton-bay-boys-college-video/?src=rss
Japanese students take over Moreton Bay Boys' College | Video
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Japanese Class – Yahoo News Search Results
Japanese Class – Yahoo News Search Results